Postboxes Royal Mail

Royal Mail has also increased its number of priority postboxes available for Monday to Saturday postings from 33,000 to over 35,000, providing increased convenience for test kit customers. Drop off your item at your local 24/7 Parcel Postbox Download the Royal Mail App to find a Parcel Postbox near you or check this page regularly to keep up to date with the latest locations. The maximum Parcel size allowed into our new Postboxes is 44cm x 35cm x 16cm.

If you live in the United Kingdom or have recently visited, you may have noticed that British red post boxes have some writing on them. There are two most common post boxes that can be categorized by their embossed writing:

  • The GR post box
  • The ER post box.

What is the meaning of these letters on the postboxes?

Royal Mail will also boost public access to postboxes in those areas currently underserved with the addition of 2,000 new postboxes. These will be targeted at rural areas, with a particular focus on Scotland and Northern Ireland, as well as to areas of new development that are currently not served by a postbox. A fast and flexible online postage tool Send a parcel right now without registering, and drop it in a parcel postbox, postbox, Royal Mail Customer Service Point (CSP), or Post Office® branch. Find your nearest location on the Royal Mail App or find your nearest branch.

. . .

On many postboxes, the clue to the meaning of these letters is on the postbox itself because you’ll often find these letters seen right next to a crown.

The letters are called the “Royal Cypher” and they signify the King or Queen that was the monarch at the time when the postbox was erected.

Post Office Boxes Size

A GR post box was put up during the era of King George (G stands for George, R stands for Rex, which is King in Latin). If there are no more letters around the GR, then it’s likely from the period of King George V, and if it’s from the era of King George VI you may notice a little “VI” next to the GR.

An ER post box was set up either during the rule of King Edward or during the time of Queen Elizabeth (E standing for Elizabeth or Edward, and R standing either for Rex or for Regina which is Queen in Latin). To know the exact monarch the postbox is honoring, have a look at the accompanying numbers. For example, if you notice a little “II” near the ER it indicates the postbox was installed in the era of Elizabeth II rather than in Edwardian times. Likewise, a “VII” or “VIII” after the ER indicates the E stands for Edward. You’ll never see a postbox from Elizabeth I’s era since she reigned between 1558-1603, long before the first red pillar post box was put up (in 1853).

Although GR and ER postboxes are perhaps the most commonly seen post boxes, you may also spot a VR on occasion. Next time you’re next to a post box, look out for these letters to work out when it was installed:

  • VR post box – Queen Victoria (postbox put up between 1853-1901)
  • ER VII post box – Edward VII (postbox put up between 1901-1910)
  • GR post box – George V (postbox put up between 1910-1936)
  • ER VIII post box – Edward VIII (postbox put up between 20 January 1936 – 11 December 1936 before he abdicated the throne to marry Wallis Simpson)
  • GR VI post box – George VI (aka Bertie from the King’s Speech: postbox put up between 1936-1952)
  • ER II post box – Elizabeth II (postbox put up between 1952-recently)

. . .

Post boxes royal mail

Related Products

© Provided by News Letter

If you’ve ordered a postal test, the process couldn’t be simpler. Your testing kit will arrive with a leaflet of information, which includes clear and detailed information on what exactly you will need to do.

© Provided by News Letter

While the test itself is relatively simple, sending your sample back can be tricky, as you need to find a ‘priority postbox’.

Mail© Provided by News Letter

So what is a priority postbox, and how can you find your nearest?

Here's everything you need to know.

What is a priority postbox?

(Image: Royal Mail)

What is a priority postbox?

The Royal Mail describes itself as a “key partner for the government's coronavirus testing programme.”

'We are collecting completed test kits from priority postboxes or from homes as part of the government programme,” it’s said.

It’s likely you’ll be asked to post your completed coronavirus test kit to one of Royal Mail’s 35,000 specially selected priority postboxes. These can be identified by the NHS/Royal Mail sticker affixed to them.

If you are expecting your local postbox to carry such a sticker, but you arrive to find it does not, you can still use it, though Royal Mail requests you let them know by calling 0345 266 8038 Monday to Friday 8am – 6pm.

There's nothing else special from a visual standpoint about these post boxes other than their stickers.

How does a priority postbox work?

The idea behind priority postboxes is that the Royal Mail can use them to get completed test kits back to the NHS as quickly as possible.

Nearest Postbox Royal Mail

Designating certain post boxes as priority ones can also help to reduce the number of post boxes that are used to collect coronavirus samples.

Royal

This means fewer postboxes come into contact with the virus, thus minimising the risk of spreading the infection.

Mail Collection Boxes Near Me

Royal Mail says it has worked “in partnership with the Chief Medical Officer to ensure that the process is safe for our colleagues.”

How do I find my nearest priority postbox?

(Photo: Stu Forster/Getty Images)

Details on how to find your nearest priority postbox are laid out clearly in the instruction booklet that arrives with your test kit.

But if you’re still having trouble, you will also be able to find your nearest priority postbox on the Royal Mail app or the Royal Mail website.

If you’re unable to access a computer or smart device, you can call 0345 266 8038.

Uk Post Royal Mail

This line is open 8am to 6pm Monday to Friday.

Postbox Times Royal Mail

For more information on the Royal Mail’s priority post boxes, head to the website

Mail Boxes From Lowe's

A version of this article originally appeared on our sister title, the Scotsman