Indoor Forklift

Electric Forklifts: Clean and Quiet For Indoor Use

Indoor Forklift Tires

The MI 45 G is a gas-propelled masted forklift truck that is ideal for indoor applications. Its performances and maneuverability make it a productive tool that will quickly be mastered by your crews. Electric forklift BT Vector R-series ride-on for very narrow aisles handling. Electric Forklift Rentals are primarily used indoors, around products sensitive to internal combustion emissions or noise. Electric truck rentals come in both 3-wheel chassis for tight turning, and 4-wheel. Leavitt represents several brands of warehouse forklift rentals, including Jungheinrich, the largest electric manufacturer in the world!

Indoor forklift storage

Electric forklifts are really the best choice for warehouses, manufacturing applications, and other indoor use, for two primary reasons.

Indoor Forklift

One is that they produce zero emissions -- if you are going to be using your lift truck indoors, this is a very important consideration. Of the internal combustion models, only propane-fueled lifts can be used indoors, and they still require very good ventilation. Gas and diesel-powered models can't be used inside at all.

The other primary advantage is fuel cost. Electric forklifts have a lower cost per hour of operation than any of the internal combustion (IC) models. This helps to offset one of their disadvantages - their higher initial cost. New electric forklifts can cost 20% to 40% more than similarly-rated IC forklifts.

Additional advantages of an electric forklift include quieter operation - another big indoor advantage - and no fuel storage requirements. Because they have fewer moving parts and are often used in cleaner environments than IC trucks, they also tend to have a longer lifespan.

Below is a quick visual summary:

Electric Forklift Specifications

Maximum available capacity

10,000 - 15,000 lbs.
Power sourceBattery
CostsHigher purchase price
Lower operating costs
Best usedIndoors
Typical ApplicationsIndoor warehouses
Manufacturing
Refueling time16 hours to recharge a battery
20 to 45 minutes to change batteries

Operating costs and benefits

In addition to the purchase price of a new or used electric forklift, you need to consider the yearly operating costs. This is an area where electric lifts excel.

  • The maintenance costs for an electric lift, running an average of 2,500 hours of operation per year, is approximately $500 per year.
  • A similar internal combustion lift has about $1,500 in maintenance costs per year.
  • The yearly operating cost for an electric lift, operating two shifts per day, 250 days a year, will be between $1,500 to $2,000.
  • A comparable LP or diesel lift will cost between $10,000 to $15,000 to operate.

The biggest downside of an electric forklift is the battery downtime. Electric forklifts are powered by large, heavy, lead-acid batteries - the same kind found in your car, but considerably larger and more powerful. The batteries typically provide enough power for one standard eight-hour shift, which translates into 5 or 6 hours of constant usage.

Charging a forklift battery takes 8 hours, plus an additional 8 hours of cooling time before it can be used. Due to this slow charging speed, if you need forklifts for two or three-shift operations, you will have to buy extra batteries so you can always be charging the next one,adding $1,000 to $2,000 to the purchase price.

Other disadvantages include the need for a battery charging station. The chargers should be located in a dry, ventilated, and temperature-controlled location. If you have multiple batteries, you will also need special cranes to change the batteries.

New electric forklifts

On average, new standard-capacity (4000 pounds) electric forklifts range from $15,000 to $25,000. Add an additional $2,500 to $5,000 for a battery and charging system. The size of the battery and operating time between charges is a factor in the purchase price of the forklift. Average lifts use a rechargeable lead-acid battery that will operate for five to six hours between recharges.

In the 3,000-pound load capacity range, prices for electric and combustion lifts are fairly equal. When it comes to larger capacity forklifts (5,000 pounds or more), electric prices are higher.

Research electric forklift dealers with a request for quote from BuyerZone.com

Hyster has been manufacturing forklifts since the 1920s. The company offers 3-wheel electric lifts, 4-wheel cushion tire lifts, electric pneumatic tire lifts, and more. The 3V30-35ZMU Very Narrow Aisle (VNA) model is perfect for indoor use. It also offers a compact design and tight turning radius. Prices for this model will depend on the choice between a 48- or 72-volt system.

Used electric forklift prices

Used electric lifts average between $5,000 to $10,000. This can be compared to the cost of used internal combustion lifts starting at around $10,000. Komatsu offers Electric Trucks in 1 to 2 ton models and larger capacity models from 2 to 3 tons. Three and four wheel styles are available in the smaller capacity. Larger capacity lifts are available in four-wheel models. Prices are based on capacity and model.

Toyota has been manufacturing forklifts since the 1950s. In 1999, the company introduced the System of Active Stability (SAS). This electronic system is designed to sense and prevent accidents for additional safety. Toyota offers four-wheel electric rider lift trucks, and stand-up rider models. Single- and double-reach lift trucks are also available. Used lifts run from $7,000 to $15,000 for models 2006 and newer.

Forklift Indoor Use

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Powered Industrial Trucks - Forklifts

Powered Industrial Trucks - Forklifts Menu Workers' Rights

Overview

  • Protect Workers Operating and Working Near Forklifts. OSHA Alert (Publication 3973), (2019).
  • Safe Forklift Operation. OSHA QuickCard™ (Publication 3949), (2019).
  • Sample Daily Checklists for Powered Industrial Trucks. Prepared by OSHA and the Industrial Trucking Association (ITA) Alliance. OSHA notes that this checklist and related graphics were developed in cooperation with the ITA as part of the OSHA-ITA Alliance.
  • Sample Daily Checklists for Powered Industrial Trucks. Prepared by the UAW-Ford National Joint Committee on Health and Safety. OSHA thanks the UAW-Ford National Joint Committee on Health and Safety for granting permission to use the checklists and related graphics.
  • Protecting Young Workers: Prohibition Against Young Workers Operating Forklifts. OSHA Safety and Health Information Bulletin (SHIB), (September 30, 2003). Informs employers that youth employment regulations (29 CFR 570) promulgated under the Fair Labor Standards Act prohibit most employees under the age of 18 years from operating forklifts for non-agricultural operations and reminds employers that all forklift operators must be trained and certified.
  • Powered Industrial Trucks (Forklift). OSHA eTool. Provides information on OSHA's Powered Industrial Truck requirements [29 CFR 1910.178] and industry best practices.
What are powered industrial trucks?

Powered industrial trucks, commonly called forklifts or lift trucks, are used in many industries, primarily to move materials. They can also be used to raise, lower, or remove large objects or a number of smaller objects on pallets or in boxes, crates, or other containers. Powered industrial trucks can either be ridden by the operator or controlled by a walking operator. Over-the-road haulage trucks and earth-moving equipment that has been modified to accept forks are not considered powered industrial trucks.

What are the hazards associated with operating powered industrial trucks?

There are many types of powered industrial trucks. Each type presents different operating hazards. For example, a sit-down, counterbalanced high-lift rider truck is more likely than a motorized hand truck to be involved in a falling load accident because the sit-down rider truck can lift a load much higher than a hand truck. Workplace type and conditions are also factors in hazards commonly associated with powered industrial trucks. For example, retail establishments often face greater challenges than other worksites in maintaining pedestrian safety. Beyond that, many workers can also be injured when (1) lift trucks are inadvertently driven off loading docks; (2) lifts fall between docks and an unsecured trailer; (3) they are struck by a lift truck; or (4) they fall while on elevated pallets and tines.

It is a violation of Federal law for anyone UNDER 18 years of age to operate a forklift or for anyone OVER 18 years of age who is not properly trained and certified to do so. Download the Sticker.

What can be done to reduce the hazards related to powered industrial trucks?

Determining the best way to protect workers from injury largely depends on the type of truck operated and the worksite where it is being used. Employers must ensure that each powered industrial truck operator is competent to operate a powered industrial truck safely, as demonstrated by the successful completion of the training and evaluation specified in 29 CFR 1910.178(l)(1).

Standards

Powered industrial trucks are addressed in specific OSHA standards for general industry and maritime.

Indoor Forklift Storage

Hazards and Solutions

Provides references that may aid in recognizing hazards associated with powered industrial trucks and provides examples of possible solutions.

Additional Resources

Used Forklifts Dallas Texas

Provides links and references to additional resources related to powered industrial trucks.

  • Protect Workers Operating and Working Near Forklifts. OSHA Alert (Publication 3973), (2019).
  • Safe Forklift Operation. OSHA QuickCard™ (Publication 3949), (2019).
  • Sample Daily Checklists for Powered Industrial Trucks. Prepared by OSHA and the Industrial Trucking Association (ITA) Alliance. OSHA notes that this checklist and related graphics were developed in cooperation with the ITA as part of the OSHA-ITA Alliance.
  • Sample Daily Checklists for Powered Industrial Trucks. Prepared by the UAW-Ford National Joint Committee on Health and Safety. OSHA thanks the UAW-Ford National Joint Committee on Health and Safety for granting permission to use the checklists and related graphics.
  • Protecting Young Workers: Prohibition Against Young Workers Operating Forklifts. OSHA Safety and Health Information Bulletin (SHIB), (September 30, 2003). Informs employers that youth employment regulations (29 CFR 570) promulgated under the Fair Labor Standards Act prohibit most employees under the age of 18 years from operating forklifts for non-agricultural operations and reminds employers that all forklift operators must be trained and certified.

Indoor Forklift Speed Limit

  • Powered Industrial Trucks (Forklift). OSHA eTool. Provides information on OSHA's Powered Industrial Truck requirements [29 CFR 1910.178] and industry best practices.